Undergraduate Degree

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DD2000

 

DD2000 Introduction to the Histories of Art III

[Lectures: 26 hours; Tutorials: 19.5 Hours; Pre-requisites: DD1003; Academic Unit: 3.0]

Pre-requisite

:

DD1003​

Academic Unit

:

3 AU

Course Description

:

Learning Objective

To deliver to students a continuation of the ideas and knowledge that they learned in DD1004.

Content

Intended as a companion course to DD1004, this course surveys the dominant art-historical traditions in Southeast Asia, through a study of their architecture, sculpture, painting, pottery, textiles and metal objects. Their materials, forms and varied functions are studied as well as the broader contexts of their manufacture. The period studied spans from c2000BC to c1400AD and will consider ways by which Buddhist and Hindu world views are represented in architecture and sculpture. Monuments such as Borobudur, Prambanan, and the temples in Angkor are analysed as projections of political and religious power.

Course Outline

S/N

Topic​

Lecture

Tutorial

1

Introduction; scope, materials, approaches and tasks

2

1.5

2

Southeast Asia as a region; mapping and defining a region. Early cultures, artifacts and art. Materials and their fabrication. Pottery, metal objects, technologies, human/animal/mythological representations

2

1.5

3

Imprints of the Buddha. Artistic domains of Buddhism. Centers of power, centers for art and patronage. Architecture and sculpture from Indonesia, 3rd-9th centuries AD. The conception of the stupa and the mandala. Icon and narrative as dominant modes of representation.

2

1.5

4

Continuation of materials from Lecture 3. Focus on Borobudur

2

1.5

5

Buddhist architecture and sculpture from Cambodia, Vietnam and Laos. Tower shrines and stupas. Icons and narrative

2

1.5

6

Buddhist themes and images from Thailand and Burma. Architecture, sculpture and painting

2

1.5

7

The mountain and its symbolism; the temple-mountain. Architecture and sculpture from Java and Bali, 9th-15th centuries AD

2

1.5

8

The temple-mountain and the stupa-mandala in Cambodia. Architecture and sculpture in Cambodia, 7th-15th centuries AD. Focus on Angkor Wat and the Bayon. Representations of religious and political authority through mythology and portraiture

2

1.5

9

Buddhist images in Southeast Asia. Representations of bodhisattvas. Representations of goddesses; conceptions of the goddess, the female and of shakti.

2

1.5

10

Alternative traditions of sculpture in Southeast Asia; “folk” or “root” or “indigenous” traditions. Human, animal and mythological representations in clay, wood, metal and stone. Formal and symbolic properties.

2

1.5

11

Traditions of pottery, fabric and wood carving in Southeast Asia; survey of materials, forms, functions and symbolic attributes.

2

1.5

12

The persistence of tradition. Revivals and inventions. Traditions in the modern.

2

1.5

13

Summary and revision of the module. Reconsidering Southeast Asia as a region.

2

1.5

Learning Outcome

The students will be familiar with the key figures and dates of South East Asian art history. They will also have a familiarity with how to place South East Asian art in context to the local and historical circumstances of its manufacture.

Student Assessment

  1. Final Assessment: 40%​

  2.  Continuous Assessment: 60% (of which at least 15% is participation)​

Continuous assessment components may include:

  • Lecture-based sessions

  • Individual and group written assignments

Textbooks/References

Recommended Reading

  1. L Frederic, The Art of Southeast Asia. Temples and Sculpture, Harry N Abrams

  2. Jean Paul Barbier, Douglas Newton (Eds), Islands and Ancestors. Indigenous Styles of Southeast Asia, Prestel

  3. Fiona Kerlogue, Arts of Southeast Asia, Thames & Hudson

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