Undergraduate Degree

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DD2005

DD2005 Survey of New Media 

​[Lecture: 39 hours; Independent Study: 13 hours; Pre-requisites: Nil; Academic Unit: 4.0] 

​Academic Unit                         :           4 AU

Pre-requisite                            :           NIL

Course Description                 :

 

Learning Objective

To present an overview of historical and current new media practice and place this history with the broader context of art history. 

 

Content

The course is an introduction to the history and development of different forms of contemporary artistic practice considered under the spectrum of New Media. The starting point of the course is the situation where fine arts expanded from painting, sculpture and other traditional forms into a new aesthetical condition characterized by novel expressions of spatiality, (im)materiality, interactivity and immersiveness, among others. At this point, the course approaches the association between new technological resources and linguistic and expressive demands within the field of visual culture. New visual genres and fields encompassed in the survey include electronic, digital and computer art; video/computer games and interactive media; internet, mobile and network art. The course also analyses a number of concepts from Cultural Studies that have found in New Media a significant field of exposure and development, such as post-humanism, hyper-reality, bio-aesthetics, cyber culture and information society.

  

Course Outline

 

k

Topic

Lecture Hours

Independent Study Hours

1

Introduction: Course outline, assignments and timeline

3

1

2

The problem of the definition of New Media

3

1

3

The expanded notion of art: From Futurism to Mass Culture

3

1

4

Multimedia performance

3

1

5

Video-art

3

1

6

Digital art: Digital painting

3

1

7

Digital art: Digital sculpture and installation

3

1

8

Animation: From physical to digital

3

1

9

Virtual reality

3

1

10

Video game art

3

1

11

Post-Humanism:  Cyborgs

3

1

12

Net art: Internet and mobile art

3

1

13

Revision of key themes and concepts. Consultation on final assignment

3

1

 

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course the student will have gained a familiarity with the place and importance of technology in the broader cannon of art practice.

 

Student Assessment

Students will be assessed by continuous assessment (100%)

 

Components include: 

(1)     Oral Presentations (45%)

Students will engage in a seminar and a class presentation, 12-minute per speaker/each assignment. The seminar adopts the format of a visual analysis on the work of a new media artist taken as a case study for the debate on particular issues, concepts or problems. The class presentation is implemented as a curatorial proposal for an exhibition on a specific form of new media art. Students will also perform as designated respondents/opponents for one seminar and one class presentation. (45%)

 

(2)     Written Assignment (40%)

The final assignment takes the form of an essay following the research methodologies and critical tools developed during the course.

 

(3)    Class participation and active discussion during the lessons (15%)

 

TEXTBOOKS/REFERENCES

Students are assigned compulsory and complementary readings.

1. Rush, Michael. New Media in Art. New York & London: Thames and Hudson, 2005

2. Baudrillard, Jean. “The Procession of Simulacra”, Simulacra and Simulation,  Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1994, pp. 1-42

3. Benjamin, Walter. “The Work of Art in the Age of its Technological Reproducibility”, The Work of Art in the Age of its Technological Reproducibility and Other Writings on Media, Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2008, pp. 19-55

4. Deleuze, Gilles and Felix Guattari. “Introduction: Rhizome”, A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia,  London: Athlone Press, 1988, c1987, pp. 3-24   

5. Dixon, Steve. “Postmodernism and Posthumanism”, Digital Performance: A History of New Media in Theater, Dance, Performance Art, and Installation, Massachusetts: MIT Press, 2007

6. Eco, Umberto. Travels in Hyperreality: Essays, London : Picador, 1987

7. Lister, Martin, “Cyberculture: Technology, Nature and Culture”, New Media: A Critical Introduction, New York: Routledge, 2009

8. Manovich, Lev. “What is New Media?”, The Language of New Media, Cambridge: MIT Press, 2001, pp.18-61

9. McLuhan, Marshall. “The Medium is the Message.” Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man, California: Gingko Press, 2003. pp.17-35


 

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