Undergraduate Degree

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DD3011

DD3011 Contemporary South-East Asian Art

[Lectures: 39 hours; Pre-requisites: Nil; Academic Unit: 4.0]

Pre-requisite

:

Nil

Academic Unit

:

4 AU

Course Description

:

Learning Objective

To introduce to students the modern and contemporary South East Asian art scene from a Singaporean perspective. To place the history of Singaporean modern and contemporary art with a broad social context.

Content

This course situates the work of a series of Singapore contemporary visual artists and art groups in larger contexts of Southeast Asian cultural production - from the 1950's to today. This course starts with the ways Southeast Asia has been imagined by Singapore artists, (as seen, for example from the perspectives of The Nanyang School painters in Singapore in the 1950's). It moves on to explore the more tangible connections, questions and contestations arising between artists and arts groups in Singapore and Southeast Asia, from the 1950's to the present.

Course Outline

S/N

Topic​

1

Introduction to Course

2

South-East Asia from Singapore.

3

Colonial Legacies

4

Multiple Modernities

5

Realism, Abstraction

6

Portraiture, Society and the Self

7

Reinventing Traditions

8

Culture/Nature, Art, Identity and Late Capitalism

9

Art and Popular Culture

10

“Bad” Public Art

11

Camp & Kitsch

12

Conceptual Art and Community Art

13

Overview of course themes; consultations on essays

Learning Outcome

The students will have been exposed to the key figures, themes and ideas of modern and contemporary Southeast Asian Art. They will also be able to critically engage with this material within a larger social and historical context.

Student Assessment

  1. Final Written Examination: 30%

  2. Continuous Assessment: 70% (of which at least 15% is participation)

Continuous assessment components may include:

  • Exercises and projects

  • Individual, group and team-based assignments

Textbooks/References

  1. Readings for this course are compiled in a compendium and drawn from a series of monographs, catalogues, compendiums and journals on Southeast Asian Art. These readings are compulsory.

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