Undergraduate Degree

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DF3004


DF3004 Digital Film Production II

[Studio Contact Hours: 39 hours;Pre-requisites:DF2001, DF2003, DF3009; Academic Unit: 3.0]

Pre-requisite

:

DF2001, DF2003, DF3009

Academic Unit

:

3 AU

Course Description

Learning Objective

To deliver to students through practice-based teaching a continuation of the skills that they learned in DF2000 Digital Film Production I. To develop the ability of the students to craft visually unique and appropriate filmic response to particular requirements.

Content

A preparatory course for FYP, Digital Film Production II brings together the aspects of lighting and art direction for the purpose of enabling the students to develop a coherent, expressive mise-en-scene and aesthetic style. This course covers the responsibilities and professional relationships of the film director, cinematographer and art director during a film’s pre-production, production and post-production, focusing on the genre adaptation of a film narrative. These fundamentals include design of lighting, sets, props, costumes, as well as, staging and choreography of genre-specific performances.

Course Outline

S/N

Topic​

1

• Intro to course

2 - 6

• Art direction and the cinematic mise-en-scene

- Formal and aesthetic components of production design

- Use of lines, shapes, rhythms, colours, textures and tones in the creation of a narrative response

• Various responsibilities of the Production Designer, Art Director, Costume Designer, Props person

• Genre filmmaking, production design and staging

- The psychological and emotional responses relevant to the design and staging of a genre film, for e.g. sci-fi, period, rom-com, horror, fantasy, mystery, gangster, etc

- Late 90s to present: Post-genre, unconventional design and identity

7

• Mid Sem review of assignments

8 - 12

• Production exercise and final project

• Translation of script to screen – planning, casting, choreography and execution of 

mise-en-scene

• Deconstruction of specific design styles 

- German Expressionism, Film-noir and the use of visual patterns in light and shadow; French New Wave and Brechtian influences in cinema; Italian Neorealism and the use of real locations as sets; Post-90s Cinema and genre-mixing, etc

13

• Final review of assignments

 

Learning Outcome

The students will have an awareness of the practical and aesthetic requirements of a film’s mise-en-scene. The students will have a awareness of the relationship between a production designer, cinematographer and director as responsible for the creation of a unique and coherent style in narrative filmmaking.

Student Assessment

  1. Final Assessment: 40%

  2. Continuous Assessment: 60% (of which at least 15% is participation)

Continuous assessment components may include:

  • Studio-based exercises and projects

  • Individual, group and team-based assignments

Textbooks/References

  1. Bruce Block, The Visual Story: Seeing the Structure of Film, TV, and New Media, Focal Press

DF3004 Digital Film Production II

Date

:

Aug 2011

Academic Year

:

AY11

Study Year (if applicable)

:

Third

Course Code & Title

:

DF3004 Digital Film Production II

Academic Unit

:

4 AU

Pre-requisite

:

DF2001, DF2003, DF3009


Course Description

DF3004           Digital Film Production II

[Studio Contact Hours: 39 hours; Pre-requisites: DF2001, DF2003, DF3009; Academic Unit: 3.0]  

Learning Objective

To deliver to students through practice-based teaching a continuation of the skills that they learned in DF2000 Digital Film Production I. To develop the ability of the students to craft visually unique and appropriate filmic response to particular requirements.

Content

A preparatory course for FYP, Digital Film Production II brings together the aspects of lighting and art direction for the purpose of enabling the students to develop a coherent, expressive mise-en-scene and aesthetic style. This course covers the responsibilities and professional relationships of the film director, cinematographer and art director during a film’s pre-production, production and post-production, focusing on the genre adaptation of a film narrative. These fundamentals include design of lighting, sets, props, costumes, as well as, staging and choreography of genre-specific performances.

Course Outline

S/N

Topic​

1

• Intro to course

2 - 6

• Art direction and the cinematic mise-en-scene

    - Formal and aesthetic components of production design

    - Use of lines, shapes, rhythms, colours, textures and tones in the creation of a narrative response

• Various responsibilities of the Production Designer, Art Director, Costume Designer, Props person

• Genre filmmaking, production design and staging

    - The psychological and emotional responses relevant to the design and staging of a genre film, for e.g. sci-fi, period, rom-com, horror, fantasy, mystery, gangster, etc

    - Late 90s to present: Post-genre, unconventional design and identity

7

• Mid Sem review of assignments

8 - 12

• Production exercise and final project

• Translation of script to screen – planning, casting, choreography and execution of 

mise-en-scene

• Deconstruction of specific design styles 

    - German Expressionism, Film-noir and the use of visual patterns in light and shadow; French New Wave and Brechtian influences in cinema; Italian Neorealism and the use of real locations as sets; Post-90s Cinema and genre-mixing, etc

13

• Final review of assignments

 

Learning Outcome

The students will have an awareness of the practical and aesthetic requirements of a film’s mise-en-scene. The students will have a awareness of the relationship between a production designer, cinematographer and director as responsible for the creation of a unique and coherent style in narrative filmmaking.

Student Assessment

  1. Final Exam: 40%

  2. Continuous Assessment: 60% (of which at least 15% is participation)

Continuous assessment components may include:

  • Studio-based exercises and projects

  • Individual, group and team-based assignments

Textbooks/Refere​nces

  1. Bruce Block, The Visual Story: Seeing the Structure of Film, TV, and New Media, Focal Press