Undergraduate Degree

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DM3012

 

DM3012 Open Source Studio: Internet Art & Culture

[Lectures: 26 hours; Tutorials: 13 hours; Supervised self-directed learning: 13 hours;    Pre-requisites: Nil; Academic Unit: 4.0]

Pre-requisite

:

NIL​

Academic Unit

:

3 AU

Course Description

:

Open Source Studio: Internet Art & Culture is an immersive online experience that engages students in networked studio practice and collaborative study. Taught both locally and online, the course explores forms of remote learning through live, weekly class sessions via web-conferencing, as well as individual student critiques with the instructor via Skype. Students work extensively in a WordPress “multi-site” system developed specifically for the course, a virtual studio environment that integrates a broad range of Web tools for artistic production, collaborative research, and online writing. The course focuses on the integration of social media and contemporary Internet practices into the studio experience, providing students with a critical understanding of the dissolving boundaries between contemporary media art, telecommunications, and global information culture. The course includes: readings by media critics, historians and scholars on the impact of the Internet on society and the individual; the critique of online artworks by contemporary artists; and critical writing focusing on a broad range of historical, theoretic, aesthetic, and technological topics pertaining to Internet art and culture. Each student is required to complete a series of micro-projects, as well as a final project, which employ the network as a medium for artistic creation.

Learning Objective

The objective of Open Source Studio: Internet Art & Culture is to develop critical and artistic skills for the interpretation and creation of networked media art. Through readings, lectures, multimedia projects, and the critique of online artworks, students are exposed to the aesthetic, historical, social, cultural, and technological issues inherent in our increasingly global media environment. Students also gain collaborative skills through study in  an  online  learning environment that  emphasizes shared, cross-disciplinary activity.

Content

This course introduces the art and culture of the Internet, including historical, aesthetic, and technological issues.

  • Techniques of data visualization and its use as an artistic form.
  • The concept of the “third space,” how we collectively inhabit networked space.
  • The aesthetics of “glitch” and other forms of online media manipulation.
  • Issues of privacy and intellectual property.
  • The impact of net culture on self and identity.
  • How we engage and communicate via social networks, and the impact on social relationships.
  • The use of the database for narrative and artistic form.



Course Outline

Week​

Topic: Summary

Lecture

Hours

Tutorial

Hours

1

Introduction: Introduction to course topics, syllabus, Website, and the overall Open Source Studio (OSS)

approach to collaborative studio art.

2

1

2

Open Source Studio: The history and concept of open source thinking, and how peer-to-peer methods of collaboration, openness, and transparency can be applied to the studio arts.

2

1

3

The Collective Artwork: Concepts and formal investigations that brought about collective forms of narrative.

2

1

4

Data Visualization: An overview of techniques used in online data manipulation that have advanced artistic

opportunities for emerging new forms.

2

1

5

The Third Space: Explore the psychological and conceptual dimensions of the third space, notions of distributed presence, the dissolution of the object, disembodiment, the immaterial, and the intimacy of the telematic embrace.

2

1

6

Glitch Aesthetics: Survey the key artists who have pioneered the art and theory of glitch aesthetics to better understand how this “outlier” form has become an emerging genre.

2

1

7

Private vs. Public: A critical look at mobile media, webcam technology, reality TV, surveillance, self- publishing, and social media, and concerning the loss of the private.

2

1

8

Midterm Project Review: Prepare a 10-minute presentation of the final project idea.

2

1

9

Identity Multiples: A discussion of identity construction and character formation.

2

1

10

Social Networks: A critical view of how social networks have become part of the artistic discourse and methods of production 

 

2

1

Learning Outcome

On successful completion of the course students will have a new understanding of the Internet as an artistic medium. They will also have new insight into the collaborative process through participation in the online learning experience, and how each student’s contribution can alter the dynamics of the learning and artistic experience. It is the premise of Internet Art & Culture that learning, exploring, discovering, and producing finds new creative agency in close interaction with other students in the course through the use of online tools. Students will have an understanding of how concepts of open source apply to artistic creation and academic study when structured in a shared, tele- communications environment that requires cooperation and transparency. Lastly, students will gain an in-depth understanding of the conceptual, aesthetic and technological skills required to create art that draws from communications media and comments on the broader global information culture.


Student Assessment

 

Students are assessed by:

  • Class Participation 10%: students are assessed based on their participation in discussion, preparation of research assignment, and effectiveness of project presentations.
  • Websites & Social Media 5%: students are critiqued according to the design and content of their Website and use of social media as integral to class assignments.
  • Micro-projects    15%: students are responsible for completing small projects that serves as sketches for their final project.
  • Research  Assignments   15%:  students  conduct  independent  research  to evaluate and critique artworks discussed in class.
  • Project Updates 10%: students are required to document progress on their final projects, learning techniques of writing and media archiving.
  • Project Hyperessay 15%: students must follow a systematic process of project development as prescribed by the instructor.
  • Final Project 30%: students complete a final project that demonstrates their conceptual understanding of issues and artistic techniques specific to Internet art and culture.

Textbooks/References

Suggested Reading:

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